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David Liang

2 results

  • CS 103

    Mathematical Foundations of Computing

    • autumn
    • winter
    • spring
    • summer
    • 2018-2019

    3 - 5 units

    What are the theoretical limits of computing power? What problems can be solved with computers? Which ones cannot? And how can we reason about the answers to these questions with mathematical certainty? This course explores the answers to these questions and serves as an introduction to discrete mathematics, computability theory, and complexity theory. At the completion of the course, students will feel comfortable writing mathematical proofs, reasoning about discrete structures, reading and writing statements in first-order logic, and working with mathematical models of computing devices. Throughout the course, students will gain exposure to some of the most exciting mathematical and philosophical ideas of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Specific topics covered include formal mathematical proofwriting, propositional and first-order logic, set theory, binary relations, functions (injections, surjections, and bijections), cardinality, basic graph theory, the pigeonhole principle, mathematical induction, finite automata, regular expressions, the Myhill-Nerode theorem, context-free grammars, Turing machines, decidable and recognizable languages, self-reference and undecidability, verifiers, and the P versus NP question. Students with significant proofwriting experience are encouraged to instead take CS154. Students interested in extra practice and support with the course are encouraged to concurrently enroll in CS103A. Prerequisite: CS106B or equivalent. CS106B may be taken concurrently with CS103.

  • CS 109

    Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists

    • autumn
    • spring
    • summer
    • 2018-2019

    3 - 5 units

    Topics include: counting and combinatorics, random variables, conditional probability, independence, distributions, expectation, point estimation, and limit theorems. Applications of probability in computer science including machine learning and the use of probability in the analysis of algorithms. Prerequisites: 103, 106B or X, multivariate calculus at the level of MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.

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